Kamala Harris Receives a Hero’s Welcome from Women in Iowa

At Kamala Harris’ first stop in Iowa this week, a woman edged her way through the crowd to meet the California senator.

Lindsay Simpson, a 33-year-old English teacher, told Harris she was a victim of sexual abuse. Simpson’s eyes brimmed with tears as she told Harris, who took both of Simpson’s hands in her own, that she felt the California senator had spoken for all the women who have experienced sexual assault when she questioned the then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, the psychology professor who accused Kavanaugh of assault when they were in high school. Kavanaugh denied the allegations.

Women Are Angry At Trump And His Party. And It’s Not Just About Kavanaugh

On a recent evening in the suburbs of Los Angeles, two dozen women gathered to talk about sexual assault.
They did so at the campaign office of Katie Hill, a Democrat running in a district that has been held by Republicans for more than two decades, and amid the drama unfolding thousands of miles away in Washington, DC, over the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, who stood accused of sexual assault himself.

Denying Women’s Ability to Know

Last week Donna Strickland, an associate professor at the University of Waterloo, won the Nobel Prize in Physics. She is the third woman to be awarded the prize in its history—Marie Curie received it in 1903 and Maria Goeppert Mayer in 1963—but as recently as last May, Wikipedia rejected a draft page about Strickland on the grounds that she did not meet “notability guidelines.” The work for which she received the Nobel—generating the “shortest and most intense laser pulses ever created by mankind,” according to the prize committee—is over 30 years old. She published the groundbreaking paper, with co-authors and now co–Nobel winners Gerard Mourou and Arthur Ashkin, in 1985. Between then and now she has won many prizes, but it took a Nobel for her to become Wikipedia-worthy.

How Christine Blasey Ford’s Testimony Changed America

History often seems inexorable in hindsight, shaped by powerful figures operating beyond our control. But when Dr. Christine Blasey Ford walked in to face the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27, raised her right hand and swore to tell the truth, it was clear that an unassuming psychology professor and mother of two was about to change the course of current events in real time.

How Christine Blasey Ford’s Testimony Changed America

History often seems inexorable in hindsight, shaped by powerful figures operating beyond our control. But when Dr. Christine Blasey Ford walked in to face the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 27, raised her right hand and swore to tell the truth, it was clear that an unassuming psychology professor and mother of two was about to change the course of current events in real time.